Research Updates

ASHT Research Updates

The Research Division has launched a new initiative to increase awareness of emerging research in the field of hand therapy. Each month, the Research Division will distribute to the ASHT membership a brief summary of an original published research paper that has been selected by members of the Research Division.

2017 Research Updates

April Update

Does sensory relearning via the performance of sensory re-education activities improve tactile function for individuals with chronic numbness greater than one year status post carpal tunnel release?    
 A recent prospective, randomized controlled trial out of the UK suggests that a home exercise program of short intensive daily sensory re-education tasks did not significantly impact tactile gnosis (measured via the Shape Identification Test), touch threshold, performance on the locognosia test, and outcome of the Moberg Pick-up Test for individuals with at least minor numbness and difficulty using small objects one year or more after carpal tunnel release. The authors (Jerosch-Herold and colleagues) did find a small change in patient reported function through the Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire, but cautioned that this did not meet clinical significance and may have been affected by study drop outs who had low self-reported functional statuses at the start of the study. The study concludes that sensory relearning for chronic sensory and functional deficits after carpal tunnel decompression is not effective.

Journal Source: The Journal of Hand Surgery (European Volume)

Access the Journal Abstract Here

Note: For non Journal of Hand Therapy articles: If you or your institution cannot access the complete article via the link, please contact Aviva Wolff, ASHT Research Division Director at wolffa@hss.edu.


March Update

Can Goniometric Measurements Be Influenced By Examiner Bias?
A new study from the Physical Therapy Department of Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem suggests that information provided to physical therapists prior to wrist range of motion assessment was associated with differential results of objective goniometric measurement of the wrist. Therapists received different information regarding the clinical condition of a healthy woman with no history of wrist injury. Therapists who were told the injury and outcome were more severe consistently measured the wrist motion as more limited, suggesting cognitive bias.

Journal Source: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

Access the Journal Abstract Here

Note: For non Journal of Hand Therapy articles: If you or your institution cannot access the complete article via the link, please contact Aviva Wolff, ASHT Research Division Director at wolffa@hss.edu.